Resources

10 Principles of Spiritual Parenting: Nurturing Your Child’s Soul by: Mimi Doe, Marsha Walch
In the hustle and bustle of everyday life, how do we, as parents, honor the spirituality of our children? As we shuttle between school, soccer practice, piano lessons, ballet lessons, birthday parties, and doctors’ appointments, how do we find the time to encourage our children, through the ups and downs of growing up, to turn to God for guidance?
In 10 Principles for Spiritual Parenting, Mimi Doe and Marsha Walch open our eyes to the spontaneous, creative, freethinking joy that characterizes a child’s innate spirituality. In ten easy-to-follow chapters containing exercises and practical suggestions, the authors point out that opportunities to express spirituality are abundant in our routine life. Talking at dinner, lighting candles, performing daily chores–all of these events have the potential to be sacred moments.
Contemporary parents face unique challenges: In our media-saturated culture, children are continually exposed to violence, cynicism, and a confusing code of ethics. By offering concrete ways to help children develop positive values, Mimi Doe and Marsha Walch support parents’ efforts to counteract negative messages.
10 Principles for Spiritual Parenting
is an invaluable guide for parents who yearn to help their children nurture a rich spirituality of their own.

Eating Animals by: Jonathan Safran Foer
Like many others, Jonathan Safran Foer spent his teenage and college years oscillating between omnivore and vegetarian. But on the brink of fatherhood—facing the prospect of having to make dietary choices on a child’s behalf—his casual questioning took on an urgency. This quest ultimately required him to visit factory farms in the middle of the night, dissect the emotional ingredients of meals from his childhood, and probe some of his most primal instincts about right and wrong.
This book is what he found. Brilliantly synthesizing philosophy, literature, science, memoir, and his own detective work, Eating Animals explores the many stories we use to justify our eating habits—folklore and pop culture, family traditions and national myth, apparent facts and inherent fictions—and how such tales can lull us into a brutal forgetting.
http://www.eatinganimals.com/

Food Matters: A Guide to Conscious Eating by Mark Bittman
We are finally starting to acknowledge the threat carbon emissions pose to our ozone layer, but few people have focused on the extent to which our consumption of meat contributes to global warming. Think about it this way: In terms of energy consumption, serving a typical family-of-four steak dinner is the rough equivalent of driving around in an SUV for three hours while leaving all the lights on at home.
Bittman offers a no-nonsense rundown on how government policy, big business marketing, and global economics influence what we choose to put on the table each evening. He demystifies buzzwords like “organic,” “sustainable,” and “local” and offers straightforward, budget-conscious advice that will help you make small changes that will shrink your carbon footprint — and your waistline.
Flexible, simple, and non-doctrinaire, the plan is based on hard science but gives you plenty of leeway to tailor your food choices to your lifestyle, schedule, and level of commitment. Bittman, a food writer who loves to eat and eats out frequently, lost thirty-five pounds and saw marked improvement in his blood levels by simply cutting meat and processed foods out of two of his three daily meals. But the simple truth, as he points out, is that as long as you eat more vegetables and whole grains, the result will be better health for you and for the world in which we live.
Unlike most things that are virtuous and healthful, Bittman’s plan doesn’t involve sacrifice. From Spinach and Sweet Potato Salad with Warm Bacon Dressing to Breakfast Bread Pudding, the recipes in Food Matters are flavorful and sophisticated. A month’s worth of meal plans shows you how Bittman chooses to eat and offers proof of how satisfying a mindful and responsible diet can be. Cheaper, healthier, and socially sound, Food Matters represents the future of American eating.

Omnivore’s Dilemma: The Secrets Behind What You Eat by Michael Pollan
“What’s for dinner?” seemed like a simple question—until journalist and supermarket detective Michael Pollan delved behind the scenes. From fast food and big organic to small farms and old-fashioned hunting and gathering, this young readers’ adaptation of Pollan’s famous food-chain exploration encourages kids to consider the personal and global health implications of their food choices.

SuperFoods: Fourteen Foods That Will Change Your Life by Steven Pratt, M.D., and Kathy Matthews
SuperFoods Rx
is based on a simple but profound premise: some foods are dramatically better than others for our health and longevity.
Sure, everyone knows that an apple is a better snack than potato chips, but do you know that a daily handful of walnuts or a bowl of blueberries can actually improve your well-being and longevity?
Steven Pratt, M.D., witnessed the positive results that occurred when his patients with age-related macular degeneration changed their diets to include certain powerhouse foods — those he has identified as SuperFoods. Backed by proven research on fourteen of the most nutrient-dense foods, this book puts these tools in your hands, and on your plate, to give you more energy, greater protection against disease, and a healthy lifestyle now and for the future.
With Dr. Pratt to guide you through the new nutritional frontier, you will be able to choose and enjoy the foods that are most beneficial to your health, well-being, and longevity.

 

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